BREAKING: Former Miami Hurricanes star RB Tyrone Moss dead at age 33

Tyrone Moss (File photo)

Former Miami Hurricanes running back Tyrone Moss has died, the program announced in a tweet Friday morning.

Moss was 33 years old. The cause of death was undisclosed.

“One of our brothers was taken too soon,” the Hurricanes football Twitter account posted Friday. “Our thoughts are with Tyrone Moss’ family and friends during this difficult time. RIP, Tyrone.”

Moss finished his college career at Miami with 1,942 rushing yards and 26 touchdowns on 412 carries. He ranks 14th on the Hurricanes’ all-time list in career rushing yards, fifth in career rushing touchdowns (tied with Duke Johnson, Melvin Bratton and Mark Walton) and 10th in career carries.

“It’s just a tragedy because he’s such a great, great kid,” said Moss’ high school coach at Pompano Beach-Ely, Steve Davis, who mentioned that Moss had been dealing with an unspecified medical condition. “For those people that knew him, he was just a great young man with a wonderful personality.”

“Just a very happy kid when I coached him in high school,” Davis said of Moss. “I don’t think I ever saw a time when he was mad. That was unusual because we coached him really hard because we knew how talented he was. We put a lot of pressure on him and he never got upset. He would always just give us a big smile.”

Before arriving at Miami, Moss was a force at the high school level. He rushed for more than 7,000 yards during his high school career and led Ely to the Class 5A state championship as a senior in 2002 before signing with the Hurricanes in 2003.

Moss went undrafted and never played in the NFL, but he did practice with the Cleveland Browns during their May 2007 minicamp. An ACL tear in his left knee during the 2005 season with the Hurricanes helped to cut his career short.

“I just want to see you smile and laugh again,” Moss’ former Hurricanes teammate Sinorice Moss tweeted Friday morning. “Rest in Peace, Tyrone.”

Hurricanes football picked to win ACC Coastal, but not ACC championship

Miami head coach Mark Richt answers a question during a news conference at the NCAA Atlantic Coast Conference college football media day in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, July 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

If the media ends up being right, the Hurricanes’ upcoming season will play out like last year’s did.

Miami was picked to finish atop the ACC’s Coastal Division for the second consecutive season with 122 of the 148 possible first-place votes, well ahead of second-place Virginia Tech’s 16 votes. Credentialed media cast votes at last week’s ACC media days in Charlotte, N.C. Continue reading “Hurricanes football picked to win ACC Coastal, but not ACC championship”

Does Hurricanes safety Jaquan Johnson still think about last year’s blowout loss to Clemson? ‘It pops in my head every day’

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As the Hurricanes’ contingent drove to The Westin Charlotte hotel for their turn at ACC media days Wednesday morning, they passed by Bank of America Stadium.

Just the sight of it brought back bad memories. Only seven months ago, Miami was crushed by Clemson 38-3 in the league’s championship game at that stadium on Dec. 2. Continue reading “Does Hurricanes safety Jaquan Johnson still think about last year’s blowout loss to Clemson? ‘It pops in my head every day’”

Hurricanes coach Mark Richt on quarterback situation: ‘Malik is the starter’

Malik Rosier #12 of the Miami Hurricanes looks on before the 2017 Capital One Orange Bowl against the Wisconsin Badgers at Hard Rock Stadium on December 30, 2017 in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — After spending the spring insisting the quarterback race had not been decided yet, coach Mark Richt arrived to the ACC’s annual kickoff event and made it clear that redshirt senior Malik Rosier is the starter. Continue reading “Hurricanes coach Mark Richt on quarterback situation: ‘Malik is the starter’”

Mark Richt nearly giddy about promise of Miami’s incoming freshmen

Hurricanes coach Mark Richt is ecstatic about the potential of wide receiver Mark Pope and many more of Miami’s incoming freshmen. (Youtube)

Mark Richt can’t stop the notifications from popping up on his phone.

“Seven more days,” pings one message.

“Five more days,” comes the next, a couple days later.

They’re not reminders from his offseason calendar, but text messages from his freshmen. They’re telling him they can’t wait for this weekend, when, according to a UM spokesman, the remainder of Miami’s yet-to-enroll freshmen are expected to report to campus.

Expected to arrive on campus: running back Camron Davis, fullback Realus George, wide receivers Mark Pope and Marquez Ezzard, tight ends Brevin Jordan and Will Mallory, offensive guard Cleveland Reed, defensive tackles Nesta Silvera and Jordan Miller, linebacker Patrick Joyner, cornerbacks Nigel Bethel and Al Blades Jr. and kicker Bubba Baxa.

Miami’s coach has never been the giddy sort. But Richt, speaking by phone on Wednesday, was more than a little eager about the potential of Pope, a five-star prospect according to Rivals, of Jordan, the No. 1-ranked prep tight end in the country, and of others.

“We’re going to look a lot different,” said Richt, who is 19-7 in two seasons at UM. “We’re going to have a lot more depth than we had a year ago. We had some good ballplayers offensively, but there wasn’t a lot of depth in some spots. By the end of the year we were kind of limping a little bit.”

A surprise November setback at Pittsburgh spoiled Miami’s 10-0 start. Losses in the ACC title game – 38-3 to Clemson – and the Orange Bowl – 34-24 to Wisconsin – further exposed the Hurricanes’ issues on offense, the area in which Richt specializes. By the end of the year, he was calling plays without his top receiver (Ahmmon Richards), tight end (Chris Herndon) and running back (Mark Walton), all felled by leg injuries. Miami also lacked a fullback, which left Richt unable to call some of the power plays he ran effectively during his Georgia days.

“If Realus George is who I think he is – that’s a big-time, legit fullback – that changes your ability to run a two-back offense and short-yardage and goal-line looks a lot different,” Richt said. “You’ve got these two tight ends coming in (Brevin Jordan and Will Mallory). If they’re who we think they are, all of a sudden we can run possibly a little bit of 12 personnel like we did with (David) Njoku and (Chris) Herndon (in 2016).

“I’m excited about it for sure. We’re going to have a little bit more diversity in our personnel groupings, and have enough guys that can make plays. You can play a bunch of guys and keep them fresh. It’s going to make a difference on how hard you can play on any given down. You can tell them, play hard. If you get tired a little bit, we’ll throw another guy in there for a little while and he’ll go hard. You’ll get back in there in a minute, so be ready. I’m all for playing a bunch of guys – more than we did in the past, I can tell you that.”

Richt has a vision for the 2018 team, more than four months before the Canes open the year Sept. 2 in Arlington, Texas, against LSU.

“I think we’ll have a bunch of guys that will embrace that we have multiple guys that can get it done,” he said, “and just be excited about everybody’s success — together, instead of ‘I’m trying to guard my playing time.’ I think we’ll have a good morale that way.”

Ex-Irish TE Durham Smythe: Miami Hurricanes fans shattered bus window in ’17

Notre Dame tight end Durham Smythe leaps for a touchdown against the visiting Hurricanes in 2016. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)

DAVIE — Tight end Durham Smythe, a fourth-round draft pick of the Dolphins, can expect a warmer welcome at Hard Rock Stadium than the last time he was there.

Smythe played at Notre Dame, which isn’t exactly popular in the Miami Hurricanes’ stadium. So unpopular, in fact, that Smythe described the rowdy welcome the Irish received last season.

“We kind of expected a loud atmosphere but nothing close to what it was,” Smythe said. “That was one of the loudest stadiums I’ve played in my five years.”

The “incredible” atmosphere, as Smythe called it, was fueled by the unbeaten Hurricanes pounding No. 3 Notre Dame 41-8 on a night that conjured memories of UM Saturday nights in the Orange Bowl.

It was a party for everybody but the Irish.

“We had people throwing stuff at the buses driving up,” Smythe said. “Actually our window was shattered and we had to get a new bus. It was pretty crazy stuff.”

Go figure, but Smythe insisted he still has good memories of his new home stadium.

“The atmosphere was great,” he said. “Obviously the outcome was terrible, but I did love playing in that stadium.”

Gould’s grades: Film review, scouting report on Miami Hurricanes freshman CB Nigel Bethel

(Getty Images photo; illustration, Matt Porter/The Palm Beach Post)

Ten of Miami’s recruits for 2018 enrolled in January and participated in spring drills in March. At that time, Post contributor Daniel Gould offered a scouting report for each player, plus a grade, a projection and other interesting tidbits.

With another wave of 2018 freshmen on the way — summer classes start May 21 — here’s a look at the rest of the class.

Gould is a Dallas-based data analyst who has been charting UM games for four years and reviewing signing classes for the last six. His evaluations are mostly based on reviews of high school highlight films, which are readily available on sites like Hudl and YouTube. He grades players on a 10-to-5 scale, rating their current skills and projecting their potential:

10: five-star caliber now, eventual All-American and immediate impact player.
9: upper-tier four-star, All-ACC caliber.
8: mid-tier four-star, impactful multi-year starter without as high a ceiling.
7: lower four-star, solid starter but not someone to build around.
6: high three-star, a role player with physical limitations that prevent a full-time starting job.
5: mid-tier three-star, likely a project or a special-teamer.
Below 5: Not a scholarship-level player at Miami.

(See below for links to previous profiles.)

Next up: Nigel Bethel, a cornerback and the brother of a former UM recruit by the same name.

NIGEL BETHEL

Bethel

Gould’s grade: 5

Scouting report: “Good height (around 6-0) but thin. Elite speed. Good in short areas and gets to top speed quickly. Good ball skills with solid hands. Looks comfortable shuffling backwards. Tackling form has issues but effort seems to be there. Has some experience at corner but mostly played receiver in high school. Shows great instincts on kick returns. Former Florida commit who committed to Miami after a late offer. More potential than anything else at this point because of his height and speed. Biggest contribution will probably come on special teams as a return man and gunner.”

More Bethel

Out of Miami Northwestern High
‘Dominated’ Miami 7-on-7 camp
Richt: ‘Super fast, exceptionally smart’

More Gould’s Grades

Early enrolleesQB Williams | RB Lingard | WR Hightower | WR Wiggins | OL Scaife | OL Campbell | DE Rousseau | DB Frierson | CB Ivey | S HallSummer arrivals: RB Davis | FB George | WR Pope | WR Ezzard | TE Jordan | TE Mallory | OL Reed | DT Silvera | DT Miller | LB Joyner | CB Blades | CB Bethel2017 signing class

 

 

Gould’s grades: Film review, scouting report on Miami Hurricanes freshman CB Al Blades Jr.

This graphic produced by Miami shows Al Blades Jr. wearing the No. 7 uniform his father wore at UM. (UM Athletics)

Ten of Miami’s recruits for 2018 enrolled in January and participated in spring drills in March. At that time, Post contributor Daniel Gould offered a scouting report for each player, plus a grade, a projection and other interesting tidbits.

With another wave of 2018 freshmen on the way — summer classes start May 21 — here’s a look at the rest of the class.

Gould is a Dallas-based data analyst who has been charting UM games for four years and reviewing signing classes for the last six. His evaluations are mostly based on reviews of high school highlight films, which are readily available on sites like Hudl and YouTube. He grades players on a 10-to-5 scale, rating their current skills and projecting their potential:

10: five-star caliber now, eventual All-American and immediate impact player.
9: upper-tier four-star, All-ACC caliber.
8: mid-tier four-star, impactful multi-year starter without as high a ceiling.
7: lower four-star, solid starter but not someone to build around.
6: high three-star, a role player with physical limitations that prevent a full-time starting job.
5: mid-tier three-star, likely a project or a special-teamer.
Below 5: Not a scholarship-level player at Miami.

(See below for links to previous profiles.)

Next up: Al Blades Jr., who arrives with family bonafides and plenty of support.

AL BLADES JR.

Blades

Gould’s grade: 7

Scouting report: ” About average size. Good enough athlete but will struggle against high-end receivers. Mirrors receivers in man coverage exceptionally well. Makes life difficult for receivers at the line of scrimmage. Plays though the man at the catch point trying to break up passes. Very aggressive player both from a mentality standpoint and on-field play. Might draw his fair share of pass interference flags both from playing too aggressive in tight coverage and making up for being beat. Good tackler but needs to improve against blocks. Played in a rotation at cornerback as a senior. Under Armour All-American. Starting potential at corner with some limitations that can be minimized with scheme design. Chance of being a nickel defender or safety depending how he develops physically.”

More Blades

For Rumph, recruiting Blades was personal
Blades committed on Father’s Day
Hurricanes will always be ‘family’ to him
Blades flashed the ‘U’ at Doak Campbell
An early story on Al Blades Jr.

More Gould’s Grades

Early enrolleesQB Williams | RB Lingard | WR Hightower | WR Wiggins | OL Scaife | OL Campbell | DE Rousseau | DB Frierson | CB Ivey | S HallSummer arrivals: RB Davis | FB George | WR Pope | WR Ezzard | TE Jordan | TE Mallory | OL Reed | DT Silvera | DT Miller | LB Joyner | CB Blades | CB Bethel2017 signing class

 

 

Gould’s grades: Film review, scouting report on Miami Hurricanes freshman LB Patrick Joyner

Patrick Joyner (247Sports)

Ten of Miami’s recruits for 2018 enrolled in January and participated in spring drills in March. At that time, Post contributor Daniel Gould offered a scouting report for each player, plus a grade, a projection and other interesting tidbits.

With another wave of 2018 freshmen on the way — summer classes start May 21 — here’s a look at the rest of the class.

Gould is a Dallas-based data analyst who has been charting UM games for four years and reviewing signing classes for the last six. His evaluations are mostly based on reviews of high school highlight films, which are readily available on sites like Hudl and YouTube. He grades players on a 10-to-5 scale, rating their current skills and projecting their potential:

10: five-star caliber now, eventual All-American and immediate impact player.
9: upper-tier four-star, All-ACC caliber.
8: mid-tier four-star, impactful multi-year starter without as high a ceiling.
7: lower four-star, solid starter but not someone to build around.
6: high three-star, a role player with physical limitations that prevent a full-time starting job.
5: mid-tier three-star, likely a project or a special-teamer.
Below 5: Not a scholarship-level player at Miami.

(See below for links to previous profiles.)

Next up: Patrick Joyner, who played defensive end in high school and projects as a linebacker.

PATRICK JOYNER

Joyner

Gould’s grade: 7

Scouting report: “Great size at 6-3 with a build to play in the 235-240 range. Fluid athlete with great lateral agility. Explosive first step whether as a standing linebacker or down lineman. Mostly tries to run around OTs but shows proficiency with an inside swim move. Wrap-up tackler who doesn’t give up much ground on contact. Looks smooth on zone drops and is comfortable in space. Good hand usage and shows awareness of ball-carriers while engaging with blockers. Doesn’t show much strength or leverage as a pass-rusher. Played mostly as an edge rusher but does have some experience off the line of scrimmage. Former Florida State commit. Just on the linebacker side of an DE/LB tweener who could play at either spot depending on the system and situations. At his best when he can play up-field but has potential as a force defender if he can grow as a linebacker.”

More Joyner

Fluid, athletic, long and explosive
Could play DE on third down

More Gould’s Grades

Early enrolleesQB Williams | RB Lingard | WR Hightower | WR Wiggins | OL Scaife | OL Campbell | DE Rousseau | DB Frierson | CB Ivey | S HallSummer arrivals: RB Davis | FB George | WR Pope | WR Ezzard | TE Jordan | TE Mallory | OL Reed | DT Silvera | DT Miller | LB Joyner | CB Blades | CB Bethel2017 signing class

 

 

Gould’s grades: Film review, scouting report on Miami Hurricanes freshman DT Jordan Miller

Jordan Miller (center) poses with (from left) UM’s Jonathan Patke, Manny Diaz, Craig Kuligowski (now at Alabama), Mark Richt and Todd Hartley. (Twitter)

Ten of Miami’s recruits for 2018 enrolled in January and participated in spring drills in March. At that time, Post contributor Daniel Gould offered a scouting report for each player, plus a grade, a projection and other interesting tidbits.

With another wave of 2018 freshmen on the way — summer classes start May 21 — here’s a look at the rest of the class.

Gould is a Dallas-based data analyst who has been charting UM games for four years and reviewing signing classes for the last six. His evaluations are mostly based on reviews of high school highlight films, which are readily available on sites like Hudl and YouTube. He grades players on a 10-to-5 scale, rating their current skills and projecting their potential:

10: five-star caliber now, eventual All-American and immediate impact player.
9: upper-tier four-star, All-ACC caliber.
8: mid-tier four-star, impactful multi-year starter without as high a ceiling.
7: lower four-star, solid starter but not someone to build around.
6: high three-star, a role player with physical limitations that prevent a full-time starting job.
5: mid-tier three-star, likely a project or a special-teamer.
Below 5: Not a scholarship-level player at Miami.

(See below for links to previous profiles.)

Next up: Jordan Miller, a big defensive tackle who Miami found late in the recruiting season.

JORDAN MILLER

Miller

Gould’s grade: 7

Scouting report: “Enormous player at 6-4 330 with some bad weight. Astounding quickness for the position and gets a great jump off the snap. Consistently fires out low and can overwhelm blockers early in plays. Mainly uses an arm-over or bull rush against blockers. Shows a good motor and chases after plays. Effective pass rusher as a 1-technique but not going to be a three-down player. Finds ball-carriers well but change-of-direction is fairly poor. Can struggle to readjust rush after initial movement is stopped. Doesn’t take on blocks very well and struggles to anchor against double teams. A rare hidden gem in modern recruiting who saw late offers from Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia Tech and South Carolina. Unique nose tackle prospect with a rare combination of overall size and quickness. Needs to improve physique and overall technique but has the ability to be a productive starter.”

More Miller

Miller a late find
Who is this guy, exactly?

More Gould’s Grades

Early enrolleesQB Williams | RB Lingard | WR Hightower | WR Wiggins | OL Scaife | OL Campbell | DE Rousseau | DB Frierson | CB Ivey | S HallSummer arrivals: RB Davis | FB George | WR Pope | WR Ezzard | TE Jordan | TE Mallory | OL Reed | DT Silvera | DT Miller | LB Joyner | CB Blades | CB Bethel2017 signing class